Culture

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Information about Culture in free legal resources:

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Culture

Culture and the Treaties of the European Union

Description of Culture provided by the European Union Commission: Whilst the will to conduct cultural activities at European level was apparent as early as the 1970s, it was not until 1991 that culture was officially given a place in European integration, through Article 151 of the Maastricht Treaty, which states that “The Community shall contribute to the flowering of the cultures of the Member States, while respecting their national and regional diversity and at the same time bringing the common cultural heritage to the fore”. To create a real European cultural area, the Union is called upon to promote cooperation between the Member States and, if necessary, to support and complement their activities in the following areas:

• the dissemination of the culture and history of the European peoples;

• the conservation of cultural heritage of European significance;

• non-commercial cultural exchanges;

• artistic, literary and audiovisual creation;

• cooperation with third countries and the competent international organisations.

For ten years, the Commission supported cultural cooperation via three experimental programmes in this sector covering the performing, plastic and visual arts, heritage and books (Kaléïdoscope, Ariane and Raphaël). The European Community has also supported the Member States’ initiative to designate a ‘European City of Culture’ each year since 1985. In 2000, the Commission adopted the Culture 2000 framework programme, a new approach to cultural action. The aim of this programme is to create a common cultural area by promoting cultural dialogue, the creation and dissemination of culture and the mobility of artists and their works, European cultural heritage, new forms of cultural expression and the socio-economic role of culture. Cultural cooperation in Europe is also promoted by specific activities funded by other European programmes than Culture 2000, in particular activities performed in the context of economic, research, education, training and regional development aid policies that also promote cultural cooperation. This cooperation in interpreted broadly, as most of the programmes are open to the member countries of the European Economic Area and the candidate countries, and third countries and international organisations are also involved.

Existential Aspects of the Development E-culture, the Law and other Social Sciences

This paper is devoted to the study of a new information age phenomenon – the electronic culture. The author introduces the philosophical analysis of electronic culture, its definition, characteristic features and functions within the society. The purpose of the article is justification theory electronic culture as a special “third nature” generated by human creativity and information technology. The article described existential aspects of the formation of e-culture. E-culture gives human beings new ways to solve existential problems (death, desolation, not liberty, relations with strange ones, and ethical choice), forming in this regard new dependences and risks for person. First of all, Internet-dependence refers to such risks. It enhances “existential vacuum”, axiological disorientation in real sphere; deformation of interpersonal communication essence with the virtualization of its sensual and emotional aspects; appearance of new freedom forms of personality ethical choice, generated by virtual interaction.[1]

Culture

This section provides an overview of culture within the legal context of Recognised Policies Protecting Domestic Policy Space in international economic law, with coverage of Protecting Domestic Policy Space (Principles).See information on the case Ancient Coin Collectors Guild v us Department of State.

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See Also

  • Educational Issues
  • Cultural Issues
  • Cultural Property
  • Import Restrictions

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See Also

  • Civil Liberty
  • Civil Right
  • Legal Right
  • Citizen Freedom
  • Political Liberty
  • Constitutional Right
  • Political Right
  • Freedom of Speech

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Further Reading

  • Valentina Vadi, “Culture,” Elgar Encyclopedia of International Economic Law, Cheltenham Glos (United Kingdom), Northampton, MA (United States)

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Notes and References

  1. Liudmila Baeva, “Existential aspects of the development E-Culture” (Encyclopedia of Information Science and Technology, 4th Edition, Information Resources Management Association, 2018)

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See Also

Popular Treaties Topics

  • Treaties of the United Nations (UN)
  • Types of Treaties
  • International Treaties
  • Famous Treaties
  • Law of Treaties
  • Numbered Treaties

Culture and the Treaties of the European Union

Description of Culture provided by the European Union Commission: Whilst the will to conduct cultural activities at European level was apparent as early as the 1970s, it was not until 1991 that culture was officially given a place in European integration, through Article 151 of the Maastricht Treaty, which states that “The Community shall contribute to the flowering of the cultures of the Member States, while respecting their national and regional diversity and at the same time bringing the common cultural heritage to the fore”. To create a real European cultural area, the Union is called upon to promote cooperation between the Member States and, if necessary, to support and complement their activities in the following areas:

• the dissemination of the culture and history of the European peoples;

• the conservation of cultural heritage of European significance;

• non-commercial cultural exchanges;

• artistic, literary and audiovisual creation;

• cooperation with third countries and the competent international organisations.

For ten years, the Commission supported cultural cooperation via three experimental programmes in this sector covering the performing, plastic and visual arts, heritage and books (Kaléïdoscope, Ariane and Raphaël). The European Community has also supported the Member States’ initiative to designate a ‘European City of Culture’ each year since 1985. In 2000, the Commission adopted the Culture 2000 framework programme, a new approach to cultural action. The aim of this programme is to create a common cultural area by promoting cultural dialogue, the creation and dissemination of culture and the mobility of artists and their works, European cultural heritage, new forms of cultural expression and the socio-economic role of culture. Cultural cooperation in Europe is also promoted by specific activities funded by other European programmes than Culture 2000, in particular activities performed in the context of economic, research, education, training and regional development aid policies that also promote cultural cooperation. This cooperation in interpreted broadly, as most of the programmes are open to the member countries of the European Economic Area and the candidate countries, and third countries and international organisations are also involved.

Resources

See Also

Popular Treaties Topics

  • Treaties of the United Nations (UN)
  • Types of Treaties
  • International Treaties
  • Famous Treaties
  • Law of Treaties
  • Numbered Treaties

Hierarchical Display of Culture

Social Questions > Culture and religion
Science > Humanities > Social sciences > Social and cultural anthropology
Education And Communications > Teaching > Level of education
Education And Communications > Communications > Communications industry
Science > Natural and applied sciences > Earth sciences > Geography > Cultural geography
Social Questions > Culture and religion > Cultural policy > Culture industry

Culture

Concept of Culture

See the dictionary definition of Culture.

Characteristics of Culture

Resources

Translation of Culture

Thesaurus of Culture

Social Questions > Culture and religion > Culture
Science > Humanities > Social sciences > Social and cultural anthropology > Culture
Education And Communications > Teaching > Level of education > Culture
Education And Communications > Communications > Communications industry > Culture
Science > Natural and applied sciences > Earth sciences > Geography > Cultural geography > Culture
Social Questions > Culture and religion > Cultural policy > Culture industry > Culture

See also

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