International Court of Justice Part 27

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International Court of Justice Part 27

 

436

THE POLITICS OF JUSTICE: WHY ISRAEL SIGNED THE International Criminal Court STATUTE AND WHAT THE SIGNATURE MEANS
Daniel A. Blumenthal
Georgia Journal of International and Comparative Law
Volume 30, Number 3, Spring 2002 p.593

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

437

The Special Court for Sierra Leone: Establishing a New Approach to International Criminal Justice
John Cerone
ILSA Journal of International and Comparative Law
Volume 8, Number 2, Spring 2002 p.379

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

438

‘WHO ATTEMPTS TOO MUCH DOES NOTHING WELL’: THE 1920 ADVISORY COMMITTEE OF JURISTS AND THE STATUTE OF THE PERMANENT COURT OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE
OLE SPIERMANN
British Year Book of International Law
Volume 73, 2002 p.187

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439

Annex – Summary of the Judgment of the International Court of Justice : Democratic Republic of Congo v. Belgium 14 February 2002
Annual Survey of International and Comparative Law
Volume 8, Spring 2002 p.151

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440

FLAWED FOREIGN POLICY: HYPOCRITICAL U.S. ATTITUDES TOWARD INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL FORUMS
Joshua B. Bevitz
Hastings Law Journal
Volume 53, Number 4, April 2002 p.931

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

International criminal justice is on the verge of making a great leap forward. The 1998 Rome Treaty for an International Criminal Court [ICC], a treaty which creates a permanent international criminal court empowered to prosecute individuals accused of genocide and war crimes, is expected to go into effect by the end of 2002, when many believe the necessary sixty ratifications will be achieved. Unlike the majority of her allies, the United States is adamantly opposed to the ICC. In fact, Congress has passed legislation aimed at reducing the effectiveness of the ICC because the ICC is believed by the United States government to be a flawed international treaty. This Note argues that the ICC treaty is not flawed. Rather, ad hoc international criminal tribunals such as the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia [ICTY], can be seen as legally and politically illegitimate. This Note argues that it is not the ICC, but United States foreign policy towards international criminal forums that is flawed.

441

A Study and Evaluation of the UN Secretary-General’s Trust Fund to Assist States in the Settlement of Disputes through the International Court of Justice – ILAAB Committee on Transnational Dispute Resolution
Chinese Journal of International Law
Volume 1, Number 1, 2002 p.234-279

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442

General international law in the European Court Court of Justice: from hypothesis to reality?
O. Elias
Netherlands Yearbook of International Law
Volume 31, 2000 p.3

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443

Maritime Delimitation and Territorial Questions Between Qatar and Bahrain
Glen Plant
American Journal of International Law
Volume 96, Number 1, January 2002 p.198

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International Court of Justice judgment on sovereignty over disputed territory and delimitation of a single maritime boundary.

444

LaGrand
William J. Aceves
American Journal of International Law
Volume 96, Number 1, January 2002 p.210

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International Court of Justice judgment on duty to inform detained persons of their right to consular assistance and on legal effect of provisional measures.

445

GERMANY v. UNITED STATES IN THE INTERNATIONAL COURT OF JUSTICE: AN INTERNATIONAL BATTLE OVER THE INTERPRETATION OF ARTICLE THIRTY-SIX OF THE Vienna Convention on Consular Relations AND PROVISIONAL MEASURES ORDERS
Stephanie Baker
Georgia Journal of International and Comparative Law
Volume 30, Number 2, Winter 2002 p.277

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446

C.G. Weeramantry at the International Court of Justice
Antony Anghie
Leiden Journal of International Law
Volume 14, Number 4, December 2001 p.829-850

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447

International Court of Justice (ICJ), The Hague
Human Rights Law Journal
Volume 22, Numbers 1-4, October 31, 2001

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448

THE BIOTECHNOLOGY DIRECTIVE: A WORK OF GEN(E)IUS?
Ilanah Simon
Bio-Science Law Review
Volume 5, Issue 1, 2001/2002 p.13

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

In Netherlands v. European Parliament and Council of the European Union, the European Court of Justice considered and rejected the Netherlands’ challenge to the legality of the EC Directive on the Legal Protection of Biotechnological Inventions, which sets out the requirements for patenting biotechnological inventions. This article outlines the Directive and critically analyses the ECJ’s decision, with particular emphasis on the arguments as to human dignity, the scope of moralty, and ordre public and compliance with other international obligations concerning patent law.

 

Conclusion

Notes

See Also

References and Further Reading

About the Author/s and Reviewer/s

Author: international

Mentioned in these Entries

International Court of Justice, International Criminal Court, International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, Settlement of Disputes.


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