Architecture of Europe

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Architecture of Europe

Architecture of Europe and the Treaties of the European Union

Description of Architecture of Europe provided by the European Union Commission: This refers to the various organisations, institutions, treaties and traditional relations making up the European area within which members work together on problems of shared interest. An essential part of this architecture was established by the Treaty on European Union, which formed three pillars: the European Community (first pillar), the common foreign and security policy (second pillar) and cooperation in the fields of justice and home affairs (third pillar). Matters falling within the second and third pillars are handled by the Community institutions (the European Council, the Council, the Commission, the European Parliament etc.), but intergovernmental procedures apply. The European Constitution, which is in the process of being ratified, envisages a total recast of the architecture. It plans to merge the three existing pillars, while maintaining the procedures specific to the CFSP and the defence policy.

Resources

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Popular Treaties Topics

  • Treaties of the United Nations (UN)
  • Types of Treaties
  • International Treaties
  • Famous Treaties
  • Law of Treaties
  • Numbered Treaties

Architecture of Europe and the Treaties of the European Union

Description of Architecture of Europe provided by the European Union Commission: This refers to the various organisations, institutions, treaties and traditional relations making up the European area within which members work together on problems of shared interest. An essential part of this architecture was established by the Treaty on European Union, which formed three pillars: the European Community (first pillar), the common foreign and security policy (second pillar) and cooperation in the fields of justice and home affairs (third pillar). Matters falling within the second and third pillars are handled by the Community institutions (the European Council, the Council, the Commission, the European Parliament etc.), but intergovernmental procedures apply. The European Constitution, which is in the process of being ratified, envisages a total recast of the architecture. It plans to merge the three existing pillars, while maintaining the procedures specific to the CFSP and the defence policy.

Resources

See Also

Popular Treaties Topics

  • Treaties of the United Nations (UN)
  • Types of Treaties
  • International Treaties
  • Famous Treaties
  • Law of Treaties
  • Numbered Treaties

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