United States Drug Enforcement Administration

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United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)

Among the U.S. federal law enforcement agencies with international activities, two have a wide-ranging global presence: the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the DEA. In the United States, some other police agencies also have clear international orientations.

“The United States Drug Enforcement Administration is the primary agency responsible for the enforcement of U.S. drug laws. Among its internationally oriented tasks, the DEA engages in anti-drug policing activities at the U.S. borders and abroad. The DEA also serves in a liaison capacity with international organizations involved with drug control. The DEA’s Operations Division comprises an Office of International Operations which is in charge of organizing the Administration’s international missions. In terms of border-related activities, the DEA is particularly active alongside the U.S.-Mexican border. The DEA’s foreign liaisons system is even more extensive than the FBI’s, maintaining 78 offices in 56 countries throughout the world.” (1)

“Not only the DEA is affected by the war on drugs, but so are some of the activities of the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (formerly called the U.S. Customs Service), the U.S. Marshals Service, and the U.S. Coast Guard.” (2)

Notes and References

  1. Deflem, Mathieu. 2005. “International Policing —The Role of the United States.” Pp. 808-812 in The Encyclopedia of Criminology, edited by Richard A. Wright and J. Mitchell Miller. New York: Routledge.
  2. Id.

Further Reading

  • Deflem, Mathieu. 2001. “International Police Cooperation in Northern America.” Pp. 71-98 in International Police Cooperation: A World Perspective, edited by Daniel J. Koenig and Dilip K. Das. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.
  • Deflem, Mathieu. 2002. Policing World Society: Historical Foundations of International Police Cooperation. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Deflem, Mathieu. 2003. “The Boundaries of International Cooperation: Problems and Prospects of U.S.-Mexican Policing.” In Corruption, Police, Security & Democracy, edited by Menachem Amir and Stanley Einstein. Huntsville, TX: Office of International Criminal Justice.
  • Dunn, Timothy J. 1996. The Militarization of the U.S.-Mexico Border, 1978-1992. Austin, TX: CMAS Books.
  • Koenig, Daniel J., and Dilip K. Das, eds. 2001. International Police Cooperation: A World Perspective. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.
  • Marenin, Otwin. 2001. “United States International Policing Activities: An Overview.” Pp. 297-322 in International Police Cooperation: A World Perspective, edited by Daniel J. Koenig and Dilip K. Das. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.
  • McDonald, William F., ed. 1997. Crime and Law Enforcement in the Global Village. Cincinnati, OH: Anderson Publishing.
  • Nadelmann, Ethan A. 1993. Cops Across Borders: The Internationalization of U.S. Criminal Law Enforcement. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press.

See also

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