United Nations

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United Nations

Introduction to United Nations

United Nations (UN), international organization of countries created to promote world peace and cooperation. The UN was founded after World War II ended in 1945. Its mission is to maintain world peace, develop good relations between countries, promote cooperation in solving the world’s problems, and encourage respect for human rights.

The UN is an organization of countries that agree to cooperate with one another. It brings together countries that are rich and poor, large and small, and have different social and political systems. Member nations pledge to settle their disputes peacefully, to refrain from using force or the threat of force against other countries, and to refuse help to any country that opposes UN actions.

UN membership is open to any country willing to further the UN mission and abide by its rules. Each country, no matter how large or small, has an equal voice and vote. Each country is also expected to pay dues to support the UN. As of 2007 the UN had 192 members, including nearly every country in the world.

The UN’s influence in world affairs has fluctuated over the years, but the organization gained new prominence beginning in the 1990s. It was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2001. Still, the UN faces constant challenges. It must continually secure the cooperation of its member nations because the organization has little independent power or authority. But getting that support is not always easy. Many nations are reluctant to defer their own authority and follow the dictates of the UN. ” (1)

Legal Materials

The U.N. is a mammoth organization, with almost innumerable offices, agencies and publications. The Official WEB Site Locator for the United Nations System of Organizations is designed to help you find U.N. Web sites. It includes a section posting the most frequently requested U.N. publications. If that doesn’t get you what you need, try the UN Legal Publications. United Nations statistics are available through UNdata.

A copy of the United Nations Charter is included in the American Jurisprudence 2d Deskbook.

A UN Web page provides links to all countries’ Permanent Missions to the U.N., which can help you locate someone to ask questions about a particular country.

The United Nations Dag Hammarskjöld Library posts a research guide covering basic research tools, indexes, quick links to U.S. documents and training guides for U.N. information systems. See also Researching the United Nations: Finding the Organization’s Internal Resource Trails by Linda Tashbook, which includes sections on finding U.N. personnel, issues, entities, operating documents, databases, research guides and treaties.

If you have access, HeinOnline provides a searchable collection of U.N. legal materials, including the United Nations Treaty Series, the Monthly Statement of Treaties & International Agreements and the United Nations Legislative Series. For the full list of titles and features, scroll down to the United Nations Law Collection in Hein’s List of Collections.

Concept of United Nations

An introductory definition of United Nations is provided here: The international organization formed at the end of World War II to be a deliberative organization for all nation states, with the goal of avoiding war and promoting improvement of international relations.

Concept of United Nations

Note: explore also the meaning of this legal term in the American Ecyclopedia of Law.

United Nations and Its Affiliates

Find out, in this world legal encyclopedia, additional information relating to United Nations and Its Affiliates.

United Nations (UN)

The United Nations, abbreviated as UN, was established on 24 October 1945 by 51 countries committed to preserving peace through international co-operation and collective security. Today, there are 193 member states, or nearly every country in the world

When countries join the United Nations they agree to accept the obligations of the UN charter, an international treaty that sets out the basic principles of international relations. According to the charter, the UN has four purposes:

to maintain international peace and security;

to develop friendly relations among nations;

to help solve international problems and promote respect for human rights;

to act as a centre for harmonising the actions of nations.

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International Organization

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Foreign Relations

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Organization

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United Nations

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United Nations System

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Related Fields

Related topics include:

International Organization

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Foreign Relations

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Organization

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United Nations

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United Nations System

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UN Agency

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United Nations

In relation to the international law practice and united nations in this world legal Encyclopedia, please see the following section:

International Organizations

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UN Reform

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United Nations

Embracing mainstream international law, this section on united nations explores the context, history and effect of the area of the law covered here.

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See Also

  • Foreign Affairs
  • National Defense

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See Also

  • Foregin Policy
  • Foreign Affairs

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See Also

  • International Organization
  • Foreign Relations
  • Organization
  • United Nations
  • United Nations System

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Further Reading

  • The entry “united nations” in the Parry and Grant Encyclopaedic Dictionary of International Law (currently, the Encyclopaedic Dictionary of International Law, 2009), Oxford University Press

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Further Information

United Nations

See Also

UNECE – United Nations Economic Commission for Europe

UNESCO – United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

UNICEF

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Notes and References

See Also

International Court of Justice
International Criminal Court (ICC)
United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL)
United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD)
United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
World Intellectual Property Organization

Hierarchical Display of United Nations

International Organisations

United Nations

Concept of United Nations

See the dictionary definition of United Nations.

Characteristics of United Nations

Resources

Translation of United Nations

Thesaurus of United Nations

International Organisations > United Nations

See also

  • Economist
  • Economics science researcher
  • Economics analyst
  • Business economist

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