International trade law Part 17

International trade law Part 17

 

193

DROIT DU COMMERCE INTERNATIONAL ET DE LA CONCURRENCE/INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND COMPETITION LAW
International Business Law Journal
Number 1, 2005

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

194

Strategies of Legal Change: Great Britain, International Law, and the Abolition of the Transatlantic Slave Trade
Holger Lutz Kern
Journal of the History of International Law
Volume 6, Number 2, September 2004 p.233

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

195

Weiler J. H. H. (ed.), The EU, the WTO, and the NAFTA. Towards a Common law of International Trade?
A. Reinisch
Austrian Review of International and European Law
Volume 7, 2002 p.434

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

196

DROIT DU COMMERCE INTERNATIONAL ET DE LA CONCURRENCE/INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND COMPETITION LAW
International Business Law Journal
Number 6, 2004

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

197

UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE MEETS GLOBALIZATION AND THE MODERN WORKFORCE
Deborah Maranville
Santa Clara Law Review
Volume 44, Number 4, 2004 p.1129

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

This article considers the impact of globalization and changes in the workforce on the unemployment insurance system, as illustrated by events leading up to recent amendments to Washington State’s Unemployment Insurance system. Changes in international trade rules impacted the economic situation in which the Boeing Company operates and gave Boeing both the incentive and the ability to threaten to assemble its next generation jet outside Washington State, if its demands for changes to Washington’s unemployment insurance system were not met. The author argues first that globalization transforms “federalism”arguments, making it difficult to assign taxing and administration of social welfare programs to either nations, or sub-national units, like American states. Second, she argues that the entry of women into the modern work force makes it important to accommodate carework in the unemployment insurance system. Reconceptualizing care work as a form of “economic development”may assist us in developing needed arguments for accommodating carework. In light of the effects of globalization, social movements and advocates concerned with unemployment insurance will require an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the links among disparate areas of the law.

198

DROIT DU COMMERCE INTERNATIONAL ET DE LA CONCURRENCE/INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND COMPETITION LAW
International Business Law Journal
Number 5, 2004

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

199

Intellectual Property Provisions in Bilateral and Regional Free Trade Agreements: What Should New Zealand Expect from a New Zealand/United States Free Trade Agreement?
Anna Kingsbury
New Zealand Business Law Quarterly
Volume 10, Number 3, September 2004 p.222

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

This article considers the implications of a possible New Zealand/United States free trade agreement for New Zealand intellectual property law and policy. It examines the international context in which intellectual property provisions of free trade agreements are negotiated. It then examines the intellectual property provisions in New Zealand’s existing free trade agreements, and compares these to the intellectual property provisions in recent trade agreements to which the United States is a party, focusing particularly on an analysis of the Australia/United States Free Trade Agreement 2004. It analyses the changes that would be likely to be required under a New Zealand/United States Free Trade Agreement, and argues that, while some changes could be beneficial, overall the changes would have significant economic costs for New Zealand users, the New Zealand economy, and New Zealand creative and innovation industries.

200

CAN-SPAM: A First Step to No-Spam
Grant C. Yang
Chicago-Kent Journal of Intellectual Property
Volume 4, Issue 1, Fall 2004 p.1

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

On December 16, 2003, President George W. Bush signed the first federal law regulating spam.[2] The law, titled the “Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography and Marketing Act of 2003” (CAN-SPAM), has garnered much criticism from scholars and the Internet community. Its effectiveness has even been questioned [3] by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the regulatory agency in charge of administering the law.[4] On the other hand, the law, effective as of January 1, 2004, [5] has the support of both Internet Service Providers (ISP)[6] and the advertising industry. [7] It has been regarded by many as a necessary step in order to combat the growing amount of spam. Critics contend that it is less effective than many of the current state laws. However, they must realize that CAN-SPAM is not meant to be a cure-all. Instead, it is a necessary first step toward uniformity in spam laws, as ultimately, the most viable solution will require an international approach.

 

 

 

Conclusion

Notes

See Also

References and Further Reading

About the Author/s and Reviewer/s

Author: international

Mentioned in these Entries

Common law, History of International Law, International trade law.