International human rights law Part 46

International human rights law Part 46

 

587

ANALYZING WOMEN’S USE OF THE INTERNET THROUGH THE RIGHTS DEBATE
Reem Bandi
Chicago-Kent Law Review
Volume 75, Number 3, 2000 p.869

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

Women’s use of the Internet has received very little attention from feminist legal commentators. While they increasingly turn to it as a source of information and as an Advocacy tool, feminist legal scholars and advocates have failed to analyze the Internet in terms of its significance to women. In this Essay, Bandi argues that feminists must be concerned that access to the Internet is often limited to relatively privileged women in relatively privileged countries. Yet, we can harness the Internet in the promotion of women’s rights and recognize it as an important feminist medium, as long as we understand its strengths and take its shortcomings into consideration. Indeed, the strengths and shortcomings of the Internet parallel to a large extent those identified by feminists in the rights debate; and the rights debate provides an established framework for assessing the Internet’s efficacy – in particular, its role in the feminist agenda of promoting dignity and equality for women. Bandi thus begins her analysis of the Internet on the familiar terrain laid out by the feminist debate over rights claims. First, she briefly sets out the debate over rights in the context of International human rights law and the evolving norms of violence against women. Next, she turns to the Internet and seeks to draw parallels between the rights debate and the Internet’s efficacy in advancing women’s rights. Finally, Bandi discusses the need for vigilance and constant evaluation of our use of the Internet, identifying some strategies that can help make the Internet more accessible to women and women’s groups around the world.

588

Health is a Human Right: Why the U.S. Immigration Law Response to Gender-Based Asylum Claims Requires More Attention to International Human Rights Norms
Caroline J. O’Neill
Journal of Contemporary Health Law and Policy
Volume 17, Issue 1, Winter 2000 p.241

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

589

Does the death row phenomenon violate a prisoner’s human rights under international law?
P Hudson
European Journal of International law
Volume 11, Number 4, 2000 p.833-856

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

590

Legal differentiation and the concept of the human rights treaty in international law
M Craven
European Journal of International law
Volume 11, Number 3, 2000 p.489-519

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

591

THE IMPACT OF INTERNATIONAL DEBT TO THE WORLD BANK AND INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND ON HUMAN RIGHTS UNDER INTERNATIONAL LAW
Lennox S. Hinds
National Lawyers Guild Review
Volume 57, Number 4, Fall 2000 p.201

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

592

The Inadequacy of International Human Rights Law to Protect the Rights of Women as Illustrated by the Crisis in Afghanistan
Eve McCabe
UCLA Journal of International Law and Foreign Affairs
Volume 5, Number 2, Fall/Winter 2000-2001 p.419

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

593

ABA INTERNATIONAL LAW AND PRACTICE SECTION SPRING 2000 MEETING: HUMAN RIGHTS, CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY, AND ECONOMIC SANCTIONS
Tulsa Journal of Comparative & International Law
Volume 8, Number 1, Fall 2000

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

594

NOT MEETING THE STANDARD: U.S. ASYLUM LAW AND GENDER RELATED CLAIMS
Lindsay A. Franke
Arizona Journal of International and Comparative Law
Volume 17, Number 3, Fall 2000 p.605

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

This Note discusses United States asylum law and its application to gender-related claims by looking at a recent case, In re R-A-. In that case, the Board of Immigration Appeals denied asylum to a woman who had been the victim of severe domestic violence and could not get aid from her government. This note argues that the immigration laws, specifically, the “particular social group”category, should be interpreted to include recognition of gender-related claims like R-A-‘s. This interpretation is in line with international guidelines on human rights and with the INS’ own regulations for handling asylum claims from women.

 

Conclusion

Notes

See Also

References and Further Reading

About the Author/s and Reviewer/s

Author: international

Mentioned in these Entries

Advocacy, International human rights law.


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