Genetic Engineering

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Genetic Engineering

The world has witnessed extraordinary advances in science over the last few decades. Biotechnology – one such area of growth – is a term covering a broad range of scientific activities used in many sectors, such as food, health and agriculture. It involves the use of living organisms or parts of living organisms to provide new methods of production and the making of new products.

Biotechnology (also commonly referred to as the life sciences, genetic modification or engineering and genomics) is presenting us with new knowledge, products and methods such as:

New vaccines to prevent disease;
Genetically modified plants with resistance to pests;
Repair of damaged organs and tissues and improved detection of diseases;
Treatments for human infertility;
Bacteria capable of cleaning up oil spills; and
Environmentally friendly biofuels.

Like any new technology there are potential benefits and risks. Health Canada is dedicated to following all aspects of the evolution of this technology in particular assessing the benefits and risks in order to help Canadians maintain and improve their health.

List of Genetic engineering online legal resources

See the entry on the List of Genetic engineering online legal resources.

Resources

Further Reading

A. Buchanan; D. W. Brock; N. Daniels; D. Wikler From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice. (2000). Cambridge University Press Cambridge, UK.
J. Davison Risk mitigation of genetically modified bacteria and plants designed for bioremediation. Journal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, 32, (2005). 639-650.
S. Krimsky Genetic Alchemy: The Social History of the Recombinant DNA Controversy. (1982). MIT Press Cambridge, MA.
Diamond v. Chakrabarty, 444 US 1028 (1980).
E. Andrianantoandro; S. Basu; D. K. Karig; R. Weiss Synthetic biology: New engineering rules for an emerging discipline. Molecular Systems Biology, 2, (2006). E1-E14.
F. Baylis; J. S. Robert The inevitability of genetic enhancement technologies. Bioethics, 18, (2004). 1-26.
D. E. Beauchamp; B. Steinbock, New Ethics for the Public’s Health. (1999). Oxford University Press New York, Oxford.
T. Burroughs; S. Knobler; J. Lederberg, The Emergence of Zoonotic Diseases: Understanding the Impact on Animal and Human Health – Workshop Summary. (2002). National Academy Press Washington, DC.
L. Carter Re-interpreting some common objections to three transgenic applications: GM foods, xenotransplantation and germ line gene modification (GLGM). Transgenic Research, 13, (2004). 583-591.
R. Fischer; E. Stoger; S. Schillberg; P. Christou; R. M. Twyman Plant-based production of biopharmaceuticals. Current Opinion in Plant Biology, 7, (2004). 152-158.
D. D. Kirk; S. R. Webb The next 15 years: Taking plant-made vaccines beyond proof of concept. Immunology and Cell Biology, 83, (2005). 248-256.
G. Kwik; J. Fitzgerald; T. V. Inglesby; T. O’Toole Biosecurity: Responsible stewardship of bioscience in an age of catastrophic terrorism. Biosecurity and Bioterrorism: Biodefense Strategy, Practice, and Science, 1, (2003). 27-35.
A. J. London Threats to the common good: Biochemical weapons and human subjects research. Hastings Center Report, 33, (2003). 17-25.
E. Pilon-Smits Phytoremediation. Annual Review of Plant Biology, 56, (2005). 15-39.
J. Rasko; G. O’Sullivan; R. Ankeny, The Ethics of Inheritable Genetic Modification: A Dividing Line? (2006). Cambridge University Press Cambridge, UK.
J. S. Robert; D. D. Kirk Ethics, biotechnology, and global health: The development of vaccines in transgenic plants. American Journal of Bioethics, 6, (2006). W29-W41.

Hierarchical Display of Genetic engineering

Production, Technology And Research > Technology and technical regulations > Biotechnology
Science > Natural and applied sciences > Life sciences > Biology > Genetics
Social Questions > Social affairs > Social life > Bio-ethics
Science > Natural and applied sciences > Life sciences > Biology > Stem cell
Agriculture, Forestry And Fisheries > Agricultural activity > Livestock farming > Animal breeding

Genetic engineering

Concept of Genetic engineering

See the dictionary definition of Genetic engineering.

Characteristics of Genetic engineering

Resources

Translation of Genetic engineering

Thesaurus of Genetic engineering

Production, Technology And Research > Technology and technical regulations > Biotechnology > Genetic engineering
Science > Natural and applied sciences > Life sciences > Biology > Genetics > Genetic engineering
Social Questions > Social affairs > Social life > Bio-ethics > Genetic engineering
Science > Natural and applied sciences > Life sciences > Biology > Stem cell > Genetic engineering
Agriculture, Forestry And Fisheries > Agricultural activity > Livestock farming > Animal breeding > Genetic engineering

See also

  • Biogenetics
  • Genetic manipulation

1 thought on “Genetic Engineering”

  1. As defined by the World Economic Forum, an “emerging technology” is a technology that:

    arises from new knowledge, or the innovative application of existing knowledge;
    leads to the rapid development of new capabilities;
    is projected to have significant systemic and long-lasting economic, social and political impacts;
    creates new opportunities for addressing global issues; and
    potentially disrupts or creates entire industries.

    With their enormous innovation potential, emerging technologies can lead to new commercial products, new approaches to protect human health or improvements in health care.

    Emerging technologies also present unique challenges for the regulatory community as their products can span multiple industries and applications, and their potential risks and benefits are uncertain. What’s more, the rapid development of emerging technologies requires regulatory systems to respond quickly to ensure effective oversight of products resulting from these technologies.

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