European Union law Part 24

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Information about European Union law Part 24 in free legal resources:

Treaties & Agreements

International Organizations

Jurisprudence $ Commentary

European Union

IP Law

European Union law Part 24

 

329

Enhancing the Legitimacy of the World Trade Organization: Why the United States and the European Union Should Support the Advisory Centre on WTO Law
Andrea Greisberger
Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law
Volume 37, Number 3, May 2004 p.827

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

330

Merger Remedies in American and European Union Competition Law 2004
Alexandre De Streel
European Competition Law Review
Volume 25, Issue 5, 2004 p.314

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331

Understanding Refugee Law in an Enlarged European Union
Rosemary Byrne, Gregor Noll, and Jens Vedsted-Hansen
European Journal of International law
Volume 15, Number 2, April 2004 p.355-379

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332

No Borders. No Boundaries. No Limits. An Analysis of Corporate Law in the European Union after the Centros Decision
Laura Jankolovits
Cardozo Journal of International & Comparative Law
Volume 11, Number 3, Spring 2004 p.973

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333

Electronic Signature Laws and the Need for Uniformity in the Global Market
Anda Lincoln
Lewis & Clark Law Review
Volume 8, Number 1, Spring 2004 p.67

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

There are an abundance of electronic signature laws. The profusion of approaches to electronic signature authentication fosters confusion for businesses as well as consumers. It also creates higher transaction costs and impedes the growth of e-commerce. This paper analyzes and compares the two foremost electronic signature laws: The Federal United States law and the European Union law . This paper details the need for global uniformity of e-commerce laws and concludes with a proposal for change.

334

EUROPEAN UNION LAW
Fordham International Law Journal
Volume 27, Number 2, January 2004

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335

Constitutional Law of the European Union
Dann
European Public Law
Volume 10, Number 1, March 2004 p.186

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336

Law in the European Union: The role of the advocate general
Philippe Léger
Journal of Legislative Studies
Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2004 p.1-8

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337

[Recent Development] Microsoft Champions Intellectual Property Rights and Loses to European Union Competition Law: Proceeding Under Article 82 of the EC Treaty Case COMP/C-3/37.792 Microsoft, March 24, 2004
Bruce Canetti
University of Illinois Journal of Law, Technology & Policy
Volume 2004, Issue 1, Spring 2004

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338

The European Union and substantive criminal law: reinventing the wheel?
S. Peers
Netherlands Yearbook of International Law
Volume 33, 2002 p.47

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339

International Trade and Economic Law and the European Union (S. DILLON)
Mark D. Engsberg
International Journal of Legal Information
Volume 32, Number 2, Summer 2004 p.506

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340

Seeing Past Privacy: Will the Development and Application of CCTV and Other Video Security Technology Compromise an Essential Constitutional Right in a Democracy, or Will the Courts Strike a Proper Balance?
Robert D. Bickel, Susan Brinkley, Wendy White
Stetson Law Review
Volume 33, Number 1, Fall 2003 p.299

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

The emerging application of closed-circuit television (CCTV) and other video security technology has sparked dialogue among legal scholars. In an attempt to reduce crime on public streets, certain cities in the United States began using video surveillance as early as 1956. The use of this technology raises constitutional concern for privacy and has been the subject of considerable debate in both the law enforcement context and the workplace setting. First, this Article discusses federal and State law concerning privacy and the constitutionality of video surveillance technology. In the tort-law context, courts have had to analyze the necessity of video surveillance in satisfying a landowner’s duty to deter criminal activities, as well as the potential imposition of tort liability on landowners for “invasion of privacy” claims stemming from the use of this same technology. Second, this Article discusses the use of CCTV in the United Kingdom, addressing the role of the European Union and Great Britain’s legislative responses to criticism. Last, this Article discusses model procedures and regulations that the CCTV Users Group has developed, which set standards and guidelines for the operation of CCTV technology in an attempt to maintain concern for individual privacy while affording CCTV the flexibility to deter crime and ensure citizen safety.

341

Public Law and the European Union: Notes Towards a Constitution
Blake, Nicholas
Judicial Review
Volume 8, Issue 4, December 2003 p.198-203

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Conclusion

Notes

See Also

References and Further Reading

About the Author/s and Reviewer/s

Author: international

Mentioned in these Entries

European Union law, State law.

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