European Economic Community

International Legal Research

Information about European Economic Community in free legal resources:

Treaties & Agreements

International Organizations

Jurisprudence $ Commentary

European Union

IP Law

European Economic Community

Summary of European Economic Community

One of the three components of the European Communities. In March 1957, the members of the European Coal and Steel Community (France, Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, and the Benelux countries) expanded the sphere of economic cooperation through the Treaty of Rome, forming the European Economic Community (EEC) and the European Atomic Energy Community. It has been the object of the EEC, as expressed in the treaty creating it, to promote “a harmonious development of economic activities, a continuous and balanced expansion, an increased stability, an accelerated raising of the standard of living and closer relations between its Member States.”

The EEC has succeeded in abolishing tariffs and quotas among members; creating a common external tariff; concluding agreements with former overseas possessions of the members (the so-called ACP Countries [q.v.]) permitting nonreciprocal duty-free importation of all industrial and most agricultural products into the EEC; developing a Common Agricultural Policy (read this and related legal terms for further details)-, establishing the virtually uninhibited movement of capital and labor among the member states; and moving toward a common European currency.

Since its foundation, the EEC has been expanded to include Great Britain, Ireland, Denmark, and Greece. Spain and Portugal will enter Jan. 1, 1986.

In 1967, the organs of the EEC were merged with those of the European Coal and Steel Community and the European Atomic Energy Community to form the European Communities.

The European Monetary System is considered here.

(Main Author: William J. Miller)

European Economic Community and the Treaties of the European Union

Description of European Economic Community provided by the European Union Commission: The European Economic Community (EEC) was established in 1958 by treaty between Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, andGermany, known, informally as the common market. The EEC was the most significant of the three treaty organisations that were consolidated in 1967 to form the European Community (EC is known since the ratification of the Maastricht treaty in 1993 as the European Union).

European Economic Community

Embracing mainstream international law, this section on european economic community explores the context, history and effect of the area of the law covered here.

European Economic Community and the European Union

Resources

See Also

  • EEC

Resources

Further Reading

  • The entry “european economic community” in the Parry and Grant Encyclopaedic Dictionary of International Law (currently, the Encyclopaedic Dictionary of International Law, 2009), Oxford University Press

Resources

See Also

Popular Treaties Topics

  • Treaties of the United Nations (UN)
  • Types of Treaties
  • International Treaties
  • Famous Treaties
  • Law of Treaties
  • Numbered Treaties

European Economic Community and the Treaties of the European Union

Description of European Economic Community provided by the European Union Commission: The European Economic Community (EEC) was established in 1958 by treaty between Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, andGermany, known, informally as the common market. The EEC was the most significant of the three treaty organisations that were consolidated in 1967 to form the European Community (EC is known since the ratification of the Maastricht treaty in 1993 as the European Union).

Resources

See Also

Popular Treaties Topics

  • Treaties of the United Nations (UN)
  • Types of Treaties
  • International Treaties
  • Famous Treaties
  • Law of Treaties
  • Numbered Treaties

Leave a Comment