Development International Law – Part 22

Development International Law – Part 22

 

201

Multilateral Development Banking: Environmental Principles and Concepts Reflecting General International Law and Public Policy
Ben Richardson
Journal of Environmental Law
Volume 14, Number 1, 2002 p.125-127

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

202

The Illusion of Progress: Unsustainable Development in International Law and Policy
Paolo Galizzi
Journal of Environmental Law
Volume 14, Number 1, 2002 p.127-130

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

203

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT, MYTH OR REALITY?: A SURVEY OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT UNDER INTERNATIONAL LAW AND SRI LANKAN LAW
Sumudu Atapattu
Georgetown International Environmental Law Review
Volume 14, Number 2, Winter 2001 p.265

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

204

International Development Law as Applicable Law to Economic Development Agreements: A Prognostic View
A. F. M. Maniruzzaman
Wisconsin International Law Journal
Volume 20, Number 1, Winter 2002 p.1

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

205

The New Timor Sea Arrangement 2001: Is Joint Development of Common Offshore Oil and Gas Deposits Mandated under International Law? (with Appendix of the Memorandum of Understanding)
David Ong
International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law
Volume 17, Number 1, January 2002 p.79

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

206

Early Development of Modern International Law in East Asia
E. Y. J. Lee
Journal of the History of International Law
Volume 4, Number 1, 2002 p.42-76

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

207

Engaging Students and Enhancing Skills: Lessons from the Development of a Web-supported International Environmental Law Conference Simulation
Mark R. Poustie
International Review of Law, Computers & Technology
Volume 15, Number 3, November 2001 p.331-344

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

208

International Law and Sustainable Development. Past Achievements and Future Challenges, edited by Alan Boyle and David Freestone, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1999, ISBN 0-19-829807-2, 408 pp., UK£65
Genoveva Hernández Uriz
Leiden Journal of International Law
Volume 14, Number 4, December 2001 p.939-946

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

209

A. Boyle; D. Freestone, eds., International Law and Sustainable Development: Past Achievements and Future Challenges, Oxford University Press, Oxford 1999, xxx + 377 pp. ISBN 0-19-829807-2.
Erik Denters
Netherlands International Law Review
Volume 48, Issue 1, May 2001 p.101-103

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

210

International Law Societies and the Development of International Law
Monroe Leigh & Cristian DeFrancia
Virginia Journal of International Law
Volume 41, Number 4, Summer 2001 p.941

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

211

Forest Fires as a Common International Concern: Precedents for the Progressive Development of International Environmental Law
Nicholas A. Robinson
Pace Environmental Law Review
Volume 18, Number 2, Summer 2001 p.459

LAW JOURNAL / LAW REVIEW

Forest fires are as old as human habitation on Earth. Traditionally, legal systems considered them to be isolated events and the responsibility of the national state within which they took place. Events have proven this legal construct to be inadequate. As Earth’s population has grown, human settlements increasingly encroach on forest lands, and natural resource exploitation of forests has intensified. In 1997 and 1998, large-scale forest fires raged on five continents. Satellite sensors measured the fires, as well as the El Niño induced dry climate conditions that set the stage for the fires. The fires spewed air pollution that crossed national borders, impairing public health, caused significant loss of human life, and impaired biodiversity over extensive regions of Earth. A huge volume of the green house gas carbon dioxide was released into the atmosphere. Nations lost resources, and their sustainable development programs were set back. Traditional rules of international law are inadequate to address such pervasive phenomena. Preventing forest fires has become a common concern of humankind. While international cooperation is required to build the capacity of States to avert or contain and extinguish fires, it is unlikely to be forthcoming before the next El Niño climate episode makes another rash of devastating fires likely. The only effective legal regimes to fight fires involve self-help. A well tested example exists in the mutual aid agreements of States and Provinces of the northeast sector of North America. States can enact national environmental laws, such as those in New York, to build indigenous capacity to prevent or control forest fires. By building national environmental law regimes, States can serve both sustainable development and preservation of biodiversity objectives.

 

Conclusion

Notes

See Also

References and Further Reading

About the Author/s and Reviewer/s

Author: international

Mentioned in these Entries

History of International Law.


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