Charter of Fundamental Rights

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Charter of Fundamental Rights

Charter of Fundamental Rights and the Treaties of the European Union

Description of Charter of Fundamental Rights provided by the European Union Commission: Following the 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in December 1998, the Cologne European Council (3 and 4 June 1999) decided to begin work on drafting a Charter of Fundamental Rights. The aim was that the fundamental rights applicable at Union level should be consolidated in a single document to raise awareness of them. The EU's Charter of Fundamental Rights was solemnly proclaimed by the Nice European Council on 7 December 2000. It is based on the Community Treaties, international conventions such as the 1950 European Convention on Human Rights and the 1989 European Social Charter, constitutional traditions common to the Member States and various European Parliament declarations. The work of drawing up the draft Charter was entrusted to a special body – a Convention – made up of sixty-two members including representatives of the European institutions and the governments of the Member States. In its seven chapters divided into 54 articles, the Charter defines fundamental rights relating to dignity, liberty, equality, solidarity, citizenship and justice. The Constitution that is currently in the process of ratification marks an important step forward for the protection of fundamental rights in theUnion. It integrates the Charter of Fundamental Rights and gives the Union the right to accede to the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). The Charter, which until now has been a solemn Declaration by the institutions, is incorporated into the Constitution and provides theUnion and the Member States with a list of fundamental rights which will be legally binding on its signatories. The Charter will also become more visible to all Europeans and make them better informed of their rights. While the ECHR is limited to protecting civil and political rights, the Charter goes further to cover workers' social rights, data protection, bioethics and the right to good administration.

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Charter of Fundamental Rights and the Treaties of the European Union

Description of Charter of Fundamental Rights provided by the European Union Commission: Following the 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in December 1998, the Cologne European Council (3 and 4 June 1999) decided to begin work on drafting a Charter of Fundamental Rights. The aim was that the fundamental rights applicable at Union level should be consolidated in a single document to raise awareness of them. The EU's Charter of Fundamental Rights was solemnly proclaimed by the Nice European Council on 7 December 2000. It is based on the Community Treaties, international conventions such as the 1950 European Convention on Human Rights and the 1989 European Social Charter, constitutional traditions common to the Member States and various European Parliament declarations. The work of drawing up the draft Charter was entrusted to a special body – a Convention – made up of sixty-two members including representatives of the European institutions and the governments of the Member States. In its seven chapters divided into 54 articles, the Charter defines fundamental rights relating to dignity, liberty, equality, solidarity, citizenship and justice. The Constitution that is currently in the process of ratification marks an important step forward for the protection of fundamental rights in theUnion. It integrates the Charter of Fundamental Rights and gives the Union the right to accede to the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). The Charter, which until now has been a solemn Declaration by the institutions, is incorporated into the Constitution and provides theUnion and the Member States with a list of fundamental rights which will be legally binding on its signatories. The Charter will also become more visible to all Europeans and make them better informed of their rights. While the ECHR is limited to protecting civil and political rights, the Charter goes further to cover workers' social rights, data protection, bioethics and the right to good administration.

Resources

See Also

Popular Treaties Topics

  • Treaties of the United Nations (UN)
  • Types of Treaties
  • International Treaties
  • Famous Treaties
  • Law of Treaties
  • Numbered Treaties

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