Dewey Decimal Classification

Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC)

The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) system is one of the world’s most widely used library classification system; but not in law libraries.

The four-volume print last edition includes thousands of updates added to the system over the past seven years. The electronic version, WebDewey, enhances the print updates with online updated delivery. Abridged Edition 15 is a simplified version used by smaller collections.

Dewey Decimal Classification Scheme (DDC), class Law

The Classification system treated law as a division, in the social science discipline. It provides class
mark of 340 349 for law collections. These class marks are:
340 Law
340.02-09 Standard sub-divisions
3401-9 Philosophy, and theory of Law, Comparative law, Law reforms, legal systems, Conflicts of law
341 International Law
342 Constitutional and Administrative law
343 Military, defence, public property, public finance tax, trade(commerce), industrial law
344 Labor, social problems and services, Education cultural law
345 Criminal law
346 Private law
347 Civil procedure and courts
348 Law (statutes), regulations, cases
349 Law of specific socio-economic regions and of specific jurisdiction and areas.

In the past, the Dewey Decimal scheme law class was:

340 General and comparative law
341 International law
342 Constitutional law
343 Criminal law subjects sub-arranged by country
344 Martial law
345 U.S. primary materials
346 U.K. and Commonwealth primary materials
347 Private law subjects, sub-arranged by country
348 Religious law
349 Rest of world primary materials, by country, sub-arranged by form

Predefined Groups in Law are:
•Clinical Training
•Dispute Resolution
•Environmental Law
•Health Law
•Intellectual Property Law
•International Law
•Legal Writing
•Tax Law
•Top 10 Law Schools
•Trial Advocacy

Example: Branches of law; laws, regulations, cases; law of specific jurisdictions, areas, socioeconomic regions (342–349

)

Classification numbers for law of specific jurisdictions and areas are built from five elements, which can be arranged in different ways to produce standard or optional numbers, according to instructions following this table:
(1) 34, the base number, indicating law
(2) A digit indicating specific branch of law, original materials, or comprehensive works as follows:
2 Constitutional and Administrative law
3 Military, defense, public property, public finance, tax, trade (commerce), industrial law
4 Labor, social service, Education , cultural law
5 Criminal law
6 Private law
7 Procedure and courts
8 Laws, regulations, cases not limited to a specific branch
9 Comprehensive works
(3) The facet indicator 0*
(4) One or more digits indicating a subject subordinate to specific branch of law or type of original material
Example: 1 Courts (from 345.01 under 345 Criminal law)
(5) Notation from Table 2 indicating the jurisdiction or area
Example: —94 Australia
To show comprehensive works on a specific jurisdiction or area in modern world, arrange the elements as follows, using law of Australia as an example:
Base number: 34
Digit indicating comprehensive works: 9
Jurisdiction or area: Australia, —94
The complete number is 349.94

To show a specific branch, a specific subject, or a kind of original material, arrange the elements as follows, using criminal courts of Australia as an example:
Base number: 34
Branch of law: Criminal law, 5
Jurisdiction or area: Australia, —94
Facet indicator: 0*
Subordinate subject in branch of law: Courts, 1
The complete number is 345.9401
Class comprehensive works in 340; class comprehensive works on law of
specific ancient jurisdictions, areas, socioeconomic regions in 340.53; class
comprehensive works on law of specific jurisdictions, areas, socioeconomic
regions in 349

Option:

To give preferred treatment to the law of a specific jurisdiction, to jurisdictions in general, to branch of law and its subordinate subjects, or to subject, use one of the following options or the option at 342–347:
*Add 00 for standard subdivisions; see instructions at beginning of Table 1

Option A:

To give local emphasis and a shorter notation to law of a specific jurisdiction or area, e.g., Australia, arrange the elements as follows, using criminal courts of Australia as an example:
Base number: 34
Branch of law: Criminal law, 5
Facet indicator: 0*
Subordinate subject in the branch of law: Courts, 1
The complete number is 345.01
(For law of a jurisdiction subordinate to the emphasized jurisdiction or area, insert between the branch of law and facet indicator the notation indicating the subordinate jurisdiction)
(To show subordinate jurisdictions of an area with regular notation from Table 2, derive the notation by dropping from the area number for subordinate jurisdiction all digits that apply to preferred jurisdiction.)
For example, drop area number for Australia —94 from area number for Tasmania —946 to obtain notation 6, which is used for Tasmania. Thus, the number for criminal procedure of Tasmania is 345.605
(To show subordinate jurisdictions of an area with irregular notation from Table 2, i.e., with numbers for subdivisions that are coordinate with the number for the entire area, derive notation by dropping the digits from area number that all subdivisions have in common. For example, Sudan’s area number is —624, while the numbers for its regions and provinces are —625–628. Drop —62 from full area number for Darfur region —627 to obtain the notation 7, which is used for Darfur region.
Thus, the number for criminal procedure of the Darfur region is 345.705

*Add 00 for standard subdivisions.

(Class comprehensive works on law of the preferred jurisdiction or area in 342; class comparative law and law of other jurisdictions and areas in 349)

Option B:

To give preferred treatment to jurisdictions in general, arrange the
elements as follows, using criminal courts of Australia as an example:
Base number: 34
Jurisdiction or area: Australia, —94
Facet indicator: 0*
Branch of law: Criminal law, 5
Subordinate subject in branch of law: Courts, 1
The complete number is 349.4051. Other examples: criminal courts of Tasmania 349.46051, texts of welfare laws of Hobart 349.4610430263

(Class law of jurisdictions in the ancient world in 340.53–340.54; class comparative law in 342; class law of socioeconomic regions in 343.1; class law of regional intergovernmental organizations in 343.2)

Option C:

To give preferred treatment to branch of law and its subordinate subjects, arrange the elements as follows, using criminal courts of Australia as an example:
Base number: 34
Branch of law: Criminal law, 5
Subordinate subject in branch of law: Courts, 1
Facet indicator: 0
Jurisdiction or area: Australia, —94
The complete number is 345.1094)

Dewey Decimal and Moys Classification Schemes

Moys used the Dewey Decimal in the layout of the schedules of her classification scheme, with the K (from the Library of Congress scheme) notation to the left and the 340 notation to the right of the page

In the first edition of her “Moys Classification and Thesaurus for Legal Materials “book, Moys required the telescoping of the seventeen legal classes (by definition the non-legal class was not needed) of her classification scheme into ten decimal classes. This was achieved by putting together in one general class the subjects contained in the first three fairly general classes of the class K scheme, by using a single class instead of three, for Common law primary materials, and by combining the four classes allocated to continents into another single class. In this way, the basic arrangement by legal system were maintained in the decimal framework, in contrast to the Dewey subject-oriented arrangement. The Dewey scheme’s tables of standard divisions for countries were used in classes 344, for Common law jurisdictions, and 349 for the rest of the world.

See Also

Conclusion

Notes

References and Further Reading

About the Author/s and Reviewer/s

Author: international

Mentioned in these Entries

Administrative law, Advocacy, Cataloging for legal materials, Classification for Law Libraries, Classification schemes in the UK, Common law, Comparison of Library of Congress and Dewey classifications about Law, Education, KF Modified, Law Classification, Law Classification, Historical, Moys Classification and Thesaurus for Legal Materials, Religious law, country.

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This entry was last modified: February 19, 2013

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